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tv   Newsday  BBC News  July 10, 2017 12:00am-12:31am BST

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this is a newsday on the bbc. clashes about the care of the chinese dissident. and the workplace where dogs are very much part of the furniture. liza fromer studios in singapore and london. this is bbc world news. it is newsday. glad you could join us. it is seven a.m. here in singapore, midnight in london and two a.m. in iraq where the government has announced the end of the battle for mosul, saying that troops had finally driven out extremists of so—called islamic state. iraq's second—largest city was where i has declared its caliphate in 2014. since then its
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grip on the territory has been degraded in iraq and syria. in the last nine months it has been targeted in mosul by the iraqi army, backed by us and coalition airstrikes. victory has come at a cost with an estimated eight thousand civilians driven from home and stop what was once a beautiful old city is now mostly rubble. every building deeply scarred or destroyed by months of war. we joined the search and rescue teams looking for survivors. but more often, they are just recovering bodies. with the heat, there is also the strong smell of decay. ali is hoping against hope that his brother and his family are still alive. their house was hit in an air strike just a few weeks ago. it was being used by islamic state fighters. ali says that he spoke to his brother on this phone
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while he was trapped somewhere under the rubble. and then, he stopped answering. all they find here is decaying corpses. it's a similar story everywhere they go. while that was happening, the iraqi prime minister was en route to mosul, to declare the liberation of the city. he arrived draped with an iraqi flag and surrounded by troops who spent the last nine months trying to wrestle the city from is control, in the toughest of battles. even this morning there was the sound of gunfire, the children so used to it, they don't even flinch. this territory up there is still under islamic state control, a small parcel of land. families are making their way through anyway they can to safety. as you can see, they are pretty desperate. it's hard to celebrate freedom from is when you have just been fighting to survive.
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these families say they have little food or water. they have left behind loved ones under rubble. many will carry the scars of this battle for the rest of their lives. these children have been prisoners of is for much of their short lives. now, after three years, iraq's prime minister has declared their city liberated. but for these families, it has come at a huge price. we will be speaking to somebody who has just returned from mosul a little later in the programme. now let's have a look at some of the other new stories. the g20 may have only recently ended, but developments from the talks between donald trump and vladimir putin keep coming. the us president has taken to twitter, saying he's discussed forming a cyber security unit with russia. but his plans to work more constructively with president putin
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have faced a backlash from fellow republicans. david willis is in washington with the latest. ina in a tweed, donald trump said that he and vladimir putin had discussed forming what he called a cyber security unit. to prevent such things such as election hacking. brochure is widely thought to have attempted to influence the outcome of the presidential election here last year. hence that suggestion of a cyber security unit, and an agreement to form it with russia, has been met with criticism here, even by members of donald trump's own party. two hours and 15 minutes of meetings, to listen and trump are ready to four given for get when it comes to cyber attacks on the american election 2016. nobody is saying, mr president, that the russians changed the outcome. you
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woi'i russians changed the outcome. you won fairand square. russians changed the outcome. you won fair and square. but they did try to attack our election system and were successful in many ways. the more you do this, the more that people are suspicious about you and russia. vladimir putin denied having anything to do with attempts to meddle in the outcome of the us presidential election. the russians say that donald trump accepted that assertion. nonetheless, the president's willingness to draw a line under this whole affair and move on has raised eyebrows here in the united states. not least because of the myriad of enquiries that are still under way into the whole affair. and, the feeling on the part of many lawmakers here, that russia is simply not to be trusted. also making news today: 0pposition demonstrators across venezuela have taken part in marches to mark 100 days since the current wave of protests against the government of nicolas maduro began. the protests come a day after the release of one
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of the country's main opposition leaders, leopoldo lopez. he was moved to house arrest after spending more than three years in a militaryjail. negotiators have been arriving in geneva for a new round of syrian peace talks. a ceasefire, brokered by the us, russia and jordan came into force on sunday in the south of syria. 0ur correspondent sophie long has been monitoring events from neighbouring beirut, and sent this report. so far the truce appears to be holding. there have been no reports of any airstrikes clashes in the area concerned since the deal took effect at midday local time. but there are plenty of reasons to be sceptical. they have been several ceasefi res sceptical. they have been several ceasefires announced in the past, none of which have held. the timing of the also significant. it comes on the eve of fresh peace talks due to
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start in geneva. expectations for what will be the seventh round of un sponsored talks are low but it is hoped that if the ceasefire holds it will create a conducive atmosphere as talks got under way. a huge anti government protest, said to be the biggest in years, has been taking place in the turkish city of istanbul. demonstrators voiced their anger at president erdogan, after a year which has seen thousands of arrests and mass sackings of civil servants, judges and journalists in the wake of a failed coup attempt. ajapanese island that bans women has been declared a world heritage site by the united nations' cultural organisation, unesco. 0kinoshima, situated betweenjapan and south korea, has for centuries been used for religious ceremonies, to pray for the safety of sailors at sea. before stepping ashore on the island, men must take off their clothes and undergo a cleansing ritual. police in california have rescued a bear cub after its head got stuck inajar.
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in a scene reminiscent of winnie the pooh, the tiny bear was seen thrashing around in an attempt to set itself free. two police officers came to its aid. 0ne held it down, while the other prised the jar off the poor little bear‘s head. doctors from the united states and germany say the chinese nobel peace prize laureate liu xiaobo can be moved abroad to get end—of—life care for late stage liver cancer — but it must be done soon. chinese doctors disagree and say he's too ill to travel. xiaobo was serving an 11—year prison term after calling for political reform in china. joining us from washington dc is chinese democracy activist dryangjian li. he has participated in the tiananmen square protests. he is a good friend of liu xiaobo. thank you forjoining us. you have
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beenin thank you forjoining us. you have been in touch with liu xiabao's friends and family. western dock to say he can travel, the chinese say he cannot. what will happen here?|j think he cannot. what will happen here?” think the visit by two doctors, one from america and the other from germany, liu xiabao expressed his wish quite clearly that he and his wife wa nted wish quite clearly that he and his wife wanted to leave china to come either to the us or germany for medical treatment. the doctors issued a joint statement saying it issued a joint statement saying it is possible for liu xiabao to have a medical evacuation, but it needs to be done as soon as possible. the reaction of the chinese dog is say that his condition is not allowing
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him to travel. it is because of, they are not decision—makers... him to travel. it is because of, they are not decision-makers. .. why are chinese government officials so relu cta nt to are chinese government officials so reluctant to release liu xiabao to travel overseas? they have a lot to fear because they fear that liu xiabao will have tremendous influence on people in the international community. liu xiabao isa international community. liu xiabao is a symbol of the democracy movement in china. he enjoys the most recognition from the international community. so the chinese communists tried to do everything to minimise his influence. you and other people are trying to lobby various western governments to put more pressure on
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china. what is the current status of this? according to the doctors' joint statement, liu xiabao expressed his options for medical treatment in germany or us. it is possible for him to have a medical evacuation. this is important. the us government engaged at the highest level with china to try to get him to come out of china as soon as possible. i still have hope. you are hoping that beijing will allow liu xiabao to travel. if you take a closer look at it, for beijing to allow liu xiabao to travel it could
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put china and its leadership in a more favourable standing with the international community.” more favourable standing with the international community. i think allowing liu xiabao to leave china will improve the image of china, not harm it. i hope the leader of china will understand that it. they should understand liu xiabao. if they did, they would know that liu xiabao, when he comes to the us or to europe, he will say a lot of positive things about the future of china. he is a dreamer. he has been working hard and made sacrifices. what he does he does for the future of china. i don't think he is at kind of person. thank you for your insights. let's return to the situation in
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iraq and the victory over so—called islamic state in the city of mosul. let's go now to the united nations humanitarian co—ordinator. you are only just back from mosul, humanitarian co—ordinator. you are onlyjust back from mosul, can you describe the situation? the condition of the civilians who have fled mosul is heartbreaking. even now is the fighting is finally stopping there are families still trapped in pockets of the old city. their conditions are terrible. the families that are coming out, you can see that many of them have not had enough food. many children are begging for water. it is heartbreaking. how do you deal with something like that? the government has launched a massive humanitarian operation. there are a number of frontline humanitarian agencies that have been providing assistance during the nine months of the
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conflict. since fighting began in 0ctober, more than 920,000 people have fled the city. when we did our contingency plan a year ago our worst—case scenario contingency plan a year ago our worst—case scenario assumed there would be 750,000 people. we passed that months ago. in fact, we have been a tiny step ahead of the crisis. there were a number of days when we were worried that if more civilians emerged we would not have room for them. we have been able to stay one step ahead for the last nine months. it is a relief that the fighting is finally open. what do you mean by one step ahead? it is difficult to comprehend the work you do in such difficult circumstances, given, especially, what these people have been through. there are 19 emergency camps that ring mosul and everyday thousands, sometimes tens of thousands of people, flee the city. everyday they flee their cross the front line where they receive food and water then they are sent
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screaming fights and then to emergency sites where they are put into camps where they have shelter and healthcare. into camps where they have shelter and healthca re. that into camps where they have shelter and healthcare. that people who have been traumatised receive specialist support and care. that care is done by the government and humanitarian agencies. it has been a long struggle. some of the children, they will know nothing else apart from fighting. how on earth do they rebuild their lives to it? the level of trauma we see is some of the highest we have seen anywhere. it is clear that the people who have fled, what they have intuitive nearly unimaginable. it will take months, yea rs, unimaginable. it will take months, years, them to recover. the international community has been criticised for not doing forward planning or thinking about the future. how do you encourage and maintain the kind of programme that will help mosul to rebuild itself? 0ur will help mosul to rebuild itself? our key message right now is that the fighting is ending but the
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humanitarian crisis is not. it will ta ke humanitarian crisis is not. it will take months, possibly years, for the people who have fled from their homes. they have lost everything. it will take months for them to return to damaged neighbourhoods. we have just finished the first assessment in western mosul with 54 residential neighbourhoods, 15 of which are com pletely neighbourhoods, 15 of which are completely destroyed. 23 a moderately destroyed. for conditions to go back to those areas, it will ta ke to go back to those areas, it will take a lot of work and finding. humanitarians have received less than half of what we ask or. here in washington there is going to be a major set of international meetings and we're here to ask the international community to stand in solidarity with the people. iraq has defeated isis for all of us. it is time we stand in solidarity with them and help the people of mosul and iraq when they need it the most. so you say you do not have everything you need. what do you need? money, weapons? what do you practically need? when we calculate
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the cost of supporting the 11 million iraqis who need some form of humanitarian assistance we knew that it would come to $985 million. we have only received 43%. we cannot do what is necessary. we can provide shelter, specialised trauma care, food, water, sanitation, healthcare thatis food, water, sanitation, healthcare that is necessary. and this is the time to the international community to step forward, sherwood solidarity with the people of iraq and provide generous funding so we can do what is necessary. we wish you the very best with your hard work. you are watching newsday on the bbc. still to come on the programme: we will find out about the thai workplace where dogs are very much part of the furniture. central london has been rocked by a series of terrorist attacks.
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police say there have been many casualties, and there is growing speculation that al-qaeda was responsible. germany will be the host of the 2006 world cup. they pipped the favourite, south africa, by a single vote. in south africa, the possibility of losing hadn't even been contemplated, and celebration parties planned in all the big cities were cancelled. the man entered the palace through a downstairs window and made his way to the queen's private bedroom. then he asked her for a cigarette, and on the pretext of arranging for some to be brought, she summoned a footman on duty, who took the man away. one child, one teacher, one book, and one pen, can change the world. education is the only solution. this is newsday on the bbc.
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i'm rico hizon in singapore. i'm kasia madera in london. our top stories: iraq's prime minister says mosul has been liberated from the group calling itself islamic state. just back from the g20 summit, and president trump says he would like to set up a joint cyber security unit with russia. let's take a look at some front pages from around the world, and we will start with the front page of the financial times, saying donald trump is facing a backlash from his critics. it says he should have been forceful in raising russian hacking claims with president putin when they met at the g20. the japan times covers some of its sites given word heritage status. it highlights three reefs and four shrines that were recognised by unesco. and wayne rooney on the front page
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of the gulf news sports section. it says the footballer has a winning mentality that could help everton win a trophy, after the player's move back to his first club after a hugely successful career at manchester united. and online, a new car model is being retweeted thousands of times over. yes, rico, a picture of a car is proving incredibly popular on the bbc website. it is the latest model which will be made by tesla, the electric car company run by elon musk. he didn't have much to say about the vehicle, just announcing it as the first—production model three. but that hasn't stopped it being retweeted more than 17,000 times, and you can find more on that on bbc.com/news. dog ownership is very
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popular in thailand, especially among the younger generation. 0ne marketing company in bangkok is encouraging employees to bring their own dogs to work, saying it helps reduce work—related stress. this is how it works. contemporary sculptures by artists like damian hirst and sarah lucas may be world —famous, but the people who actually make them are less well—known. now, a new exhibition in the northern english city of chester is focusing on the foundries where the works are made. 0ur arts editor will gompertz has been finding out more. the medieval magnificence of chester cathedral, where, for the rest of the summer, gothic splendour will rub shoulders with contemporary art.
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the artists on show are well—known — damien hirst, lynn chadwick, angus fairhurst, and sarah lucas. but they did not make the works. they were fabricated here, deep in rural gloucestershire, at what is quite possibly the largest art—specific foundry in the world. this is a sand mould, so that's another way of casting the work... it was set up by rungwe kingdon and his wife in the mid—1980s, and now employs nearly 200 craftsmen and women, producing sculptures, sometimes with nothing more to go on than a sketched drawing from an artist. the old —fashioned way of an artist making an object, bringing it to a foundry, and there's a service, you get it, you make a mould and you cast it into bronze, that's actually probably a smaller part of what we do now. it's much more about artists trying to make an image with a foundry. do you ever get to a situation
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where you think, "0h, for goodness' sake, ishould be signing this work?" no, absolutely not. you need artists. you need their language, you need their image, you need their ideas. they are the people who literally create our culture, and we are the people who help them make that a material reality. the cathedral is the most amazing connection to craftsmanship of another age. and to be able to put the craftsmanship and the art of this age, to be compared and to react to the art and the craft of the mediaeval age, seems to me to be a beautiful thing to do. you have been watching newsday. stay with us. within a decade, nearly a third of the cars on china's roads are set to be electric vehicles. what will it mean for manufacturers? and we leave you with pictures from the cliff diving world series, where
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columbia's 0rlando duke saw off the challenge of much younger competitors to finish top of the podium. absolutely thrilling. hello there. the weekend's weather brought us plenty of warm sunshine. there was a bit of rain across northern and western parts of the country, but as we had through much of the coming week, things are about to change. here is a scene sent in from sunday afternoon, southend—on—sea in essex. now, through the course of this coming week the weather is much more changeable. there will be some rain for many of us at times, and things won't be quite as warm. so cooler conditions, particularly overnight, you will be pleased to hear if you found it very uncomfortable for sleeping in recent nights. now, during monday we have low pressure and frontal system is not far away from the uk, bringing some showery rain to many parts of the country. through the day on monday, one frontal system brings bit of rain to the east of scotland, north—east of england as well, that should ease away through the day. and then for all of us it is a day of sunny
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spells and scattered showers and across east of england in particular some of the showers heavy and thundery, bringing a lot of heavy rain and some hail and thunder as well. northern ireland, though, having a dry day with some sunshine into the west of scotland. eastern scotla nd into the west of scotland. eastern scotland staying fairly cloudy and damp and then as we had our way south across england and wales, some heavy showers especially towards the east could catch one or two heavy showers almost anywhere across england and could catch one or two heavy showers almost anywhere across england and the south—west probably having a dry interlude south—east. still some torrential downpours bringing some torrential downpours bringing some torrential downpours bringing subsurface water flooding. now, there is the chance that the showers could stay away from wimbledon, so a largely dry day but there is the chance that we could see some showers interrupting play, i think, during the afternoon. then, heading through into the evening hours, those heavy showers in the east eventually start using away. thunderstorms dying down overnight, but then we will see the next batch of rain moving during the afternoon, we could see 26 celsius in the south—east. still some torrential downpours bringing subsurface water flooding. now, there is the chance that the showers could stay away
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from wimbledon, so a largely dry day but there is the chance that we could see some showers interrupting play, i think, could see some showers interrupting play, ithink, during could see some showers interrupting play, i think, during the afternoon. then, heading through into the evening hours, those heavy showers in the east eventually start using away. thunderstorms dying down overnight, but then we will see the next batch of rain moving through the west into the early hours of so tuesday, then, starts off not quite as high and mighty as recent nights, but still 15 or 16 degrees across the south—east. and then as we move through the day, this showery rain from central parts of england and wales moves eastwards. still some dry weather, though, for the north—west of scotland and northern ireland as persistent rain works into the south—west of england later on in the more persistent rain works into the south—west of england later on in. temperatures 15 to 21 degrees, reasonably fresher than it has been. through into wednesday, then, that rain works its way eastwards. so some rain, some welcome rain for a time in the south—east, that should clear away and then the rest of us the time of year. certainly fresher than it has been. through into wednesday, then, that rain works its way eastwards. so some rain, some welcome rain for a time in the south—east, that
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should clear away and then the rest of moderate rain on wednesday with a light breeze, and temperatures around 15 to 22 degrees. taking you through towards the end of the week, we will see some rain at in the north—west, and temperatures continue to be not as hot as they have been. goodbye for now. iraq's prime minister says mosul has been liberated from the islamic state group. it brings to an end almost nine months of fighting in the city. haider al—abadi has been on the streets of mosul, congratulating the troops just back from the g20 summit, and president trump says he'd like to set up a joint cyber security unit, with russia. he said it would guard against election hacking and "many other negative things". and this story is trending on bbc.com. in a scene reminiscent of winnie the pooh, this baby bear got his head stuck in a jar. two police officers found him thrashing around and came to his help. 0ne held him down, while the other prised the jar off the poor little bear‘s head that's all from me now.
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